Irregular Comparative And Superlative Adjectives Worksheet Pdf

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Comparative Form The descriptive form is used to describe one noun or pronoun.

Comparing Adjectives: Good & Bad

An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield covering ways to approach teaching comparatives and superlatives. One way of describing a person or thing is by saying that they have more of a particular quality than someone or something else. It is also possible to describe someone or something by saying that they have more of a particular quality than any other of their kind.

We do this by using superlative adjectives, which are formed by adding -est at the end of the adjective and placing the before it, or placing the most before the adjective, e.

One syllable adjectives generally form the comparative by adding -er and the superlative by adding -est , e. Here are three examples. The comparative of ill is worse , and the comparative of well is better , e. The usual comparative and superlative forms of the adjective old are older and oldest. However, the alternative forms elder and eldest are sometimes used. Elder and eldest are generally restricted to talking about the age of people, especially people within the same family, and are not used to talk about the age of things, e.

Elder cannot occur in the predicative position after link verbs such as be , become , get , e. Comparatives and superlatives of compound adjectives are generally formed by using more and most , e. Common examples of adjectives like these are: complete , equal , favourite , and perfect. Just like other adjectives, comparatives can be placed before nouns in the attributive position, e.

Comparatives are very commonly followed by than and a pronoun or noun group, in order to describe who the other person or thing involved in the comparison is, e. Two comparatives can be contrasted by placing the before them, indicating that a change in one quality is linked to a change in another, e. Two comparatives can also be linked with and to show a continuing increase in a particular quality, e. Like comparatives, superlatives can be placed before nouns in the attributive position, or occur after be and other link verbs, e.

As shown in the second two examples, superlatives are often used on their own if it is clear what or who is being compared. If you want to be specific about what you are comparing, you can do this with a noun, or a phrase beginning with in or of, e. Another way of being specific is by placing a relative clause after the superlative, e. Note that if the superlative occurs before the noun, in the attributive position, the in or of phrase or relative clause comes after the noun, eg.

Although the usually occurs before a superlative, it is sometimes left out in informal speech or writing, e. Sometimes possessive pronouns are used instead of the before a superlative, e. Ordinal numbers are often used with superlatives to indicate that something has more of a particular quality than most others of its kind, e.

In informal conversation, superlatives are often used instead of comparatives when comparing two things. For example, when comparing a train journey and car journey to Edinburgh, someone might say: the train is quickest , rather than: the train is quicker.

Superlatives are not generally used in this way in formal speech and writing. If we want to talk about a quality which is smaller in amount relative to others, we use the forms less the opposite of comparative more , and the least the opposite of superlative the most.

Less is used to indicate that something or someone does not have as much of a particular quality as someone or something else, e. The least is used to indicate that something or someone has less of a quality than any other person or thing of its kind, e. An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on ways to approach teaching the present perfect aspect. Articles, tips and activities covering everything you need to know about verbs and tenses, including reported speech, passives and modals.

Our experts provide a compendium of tips and ideas for teaching nouns, prepositions and relative clauses in English. With more than , registered users in over countries around the world, Onestopenglish is the number one resource site for English language teachers, providing access to thousands of resources, including lesson plans, worksheets, audio, video and flashcards.

Company number: VAT number: Site powered by Webvision Cloud. Skip to main content Skip to navigation. Support for teaching grammar. No comments. Source: SerjioLe, iStockphoto. The street has become quieter since they left. You should be more sensible. John is taller than me. The more stressed you are, the worse it is for your health.

Her illness was becoming worse and worse. He became more and more tired as the weeks went by. This one is the cheapest of the new designs. The cathedral is the second most popular tourist attraction. She was the least intelligent of the three sisters. Adjectives 1 Adjectives. Adjectives and noun modifiers in English — article. Adjectives and noun modifiers in English — tips and activities. Currently reading Comparative and superlative adjectives — article. Comparative and superlative adjectives — tips and activities.

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Irregular Comparative & Superlative Adjectives Word Search PDF

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Comparatives and Superlatives Printable Worksheets. Adjectives that Compare: Comparative and Superlative. Children learn how to identify both regular and irregular comparative and superlative adjectives as they complete each of 20 sentences. Children practice working with comparative and superlative adjectives in this hands-on grammar worksheet. Comparatives and Superlatives. Students practice identifying and using comparative and superlative versions of common adjectives in this grammar worksheet. Using Comparative and Superlative Adjectives.


There are a lot of irregular comparatives and superlatives. True. False. 2. Grammar videos: Comparative and superlative adjectives – exercises. Watch the​.


Good and bad exercises

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irregular comparative and superlative

Comparative and superlative adjectives – article

An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield covering ways to approach teaching comparatives and superlatives. One way of describing a person or thing is by saying that they have more of a particular quality than someone or something else. It is also possible to describe someone or something by saying that they have more of a particular quality than any other of their kind. We do this by using superlative adjectives, which are formed by adding -est at the end of the adjective and placing the before it, or placing the most before the adjective, e. One syllable adjectives generally form the comparative by adding -er and the superlative by adding -est , e. Here are three examples. The comparative of ill is worse , and the comparative of well is better , e.

Adjectives that Compare: Comparative and Superlative. Children learn how to identify both regular and irregular comparative and superlative adjectives as they complete each of 20 sentences. Children practice working with comparative and superlative adjectives in this hands-on grammar worksheet. Comparatives and Superlatives. Students practice identifying and using comparative and superlative versions of common adjectives in this grammar worksheet.

A superlative adjective is used when you compare three or more things. For example, looking at apples you can compare their size, determining which is big, which is bigger, and which is biggest. The comparative ending suffix for short, common adjectives is generally "-er"; the superlative suffix is generally "-est. If a 1-syllable adjective ends in "e", the endings are "-r" and "-st", for example: wise, wiser, wisest. If a 1-syllable adjective ends in "y", the endings are "-er" and "-est", but the y is sometimes changed to an "i". For example: dry, drier, driest. If a 1-syllable adjective ends in a consonant with a single vowel preceding it , then the consonant is doubled and the endings "-er" and "-est" are used, for example: big, bigger, biggest.

Old, big, expensive are adjectives. Older, bigger, more expensive are comparative forms. Leona - November 21, , am Reply.

Worksheet Download : comparative-superlative-worksheet-esl. For example, here are two boys. To make comparative sentences like this, we make a regular sentence and change the adjective to a comparative form.

2 Response
  1. James H.

    Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

  2. Felisa L.

    A comparative adjective is used to compare two nouns denoting a higher or lower degree of quality with respect to one another.

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